What is SSK in Knitting?

If you’re a knitter, you probably know that there are a lot of abbreviations and acronyms used to describe different stitches and techniques. The abbreviation is “ssk,” which stands for “slip, slip, knit.” In this post, we’ll take a closer look at the SSK in Knitting and how to do the stitch.

What does SSK in knitting mean?

In knitting, SSK stands for “slip, slip, knit” and it is a commonly used decrease technique. It involves slipping two stitches knitwise from the left needle to the right needle, and then knitting them together through the back loop. This creates a left-leaning decrease, which is often used in shaping garments and accessories.

The Ssk stitch is a decreased stitch that slants to the left. To do the stitch, you’ll start by slipping two stitches from the left needle to the right needle, one at a time. Next, you’ll insert the left needle into the fronts of those two slipped stitches and knit them together. This will create one stitch on the right needle and decrease the number of stitches on the left needle by one.

One thing to keep in mind with this stitch is that it can be easy to twist the stitches when you slip them from the left needle to the right. To avoid this, make sure that you slip them purlwise with the needles positioned as if you were going to purl them. This will ensure that the stitches stay oriented correctly and don’t get twisted.

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How to do an SSK stitch?

The SSK (slip knit) stitch is a commonly used decrease stitch in knitting. It is often used in lace patterns to create a slanted decrease that leans to the left. Here’s how to do an SSK stitch:

  1. Slip the first stitch knitwise from the left needle to the right needle.
  2. Slip the second stitch knitwise in the same way.
  3. Insert the left needle into the front loops of both slipped stitches, from left to right.
  4. Knit these two stitches together through the back loop.

This will result in a decrease that leans to the left. The SSK stitch is similar to the K2tog (knit two-together) stitch, but instead of knitting two stitches together, you slip them knitwise and then knit them together through the back loop.

It’s important to note that the SSK stitch can be a bit tricky to master, especially if you’re new to knitting. Practice on a swatch or scrap piece of knitting to get comfortable with the technique before trying it in a pattern. With practice, you’ll be able to create neat, professional-looking decreases with ease.

Conclusion

The Ssk stitch is a handy decrease stitch that slants to the left. It’s easy to do once you get the hang of it, and it’s a great way to create neat, professional-looking edges on your knitting projects. So next time you see a pattern that calls for ssk, don’t be intimidated give it a try. You might just find that it’s one of your new favorite stitches.

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